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Rep. Crockett defends selling shirts mocking MTG’s ‘butch body,’ claims it can ‘help save our democracy’

Rep. Crockett defends selling shirts mocking MTG's 'butch body,' claims it can 'help save our democracy'

Rep. Crockett defends selling shirts mocking MTG’s ‘butch body,’ claims it can ‘help save our democracy’. Rep. Jasmine Crockett (D-Texas) appeared on “The View” and discussed how she turned an insult aimed at her by Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) into merchandise, with the proceeds going to help the Democratic Party. Crockett trademarked the phrase “bleach blonde bad built butch body” and is selling items like hats, hoodies, and socks with the slogan.

Crockett defended her decision, saying it was a way to raise money for the party and support frontline candidates. She also noted that the phrase had gone viral and been remixed into a rap song, which host Whoopi Goldberg played on the show.

Goldberg praised Crockett for standing up to Greene and noted that the exchange showed that people wouldn’t tolerate put-downs without facts to back them up. Crockett emphasized that it was about respect and doing the work of the people, not partisanship.

The hosts discussed the concept of “the Dozens,” a game of trading insults, and Crockett said she was amused by her insult being turned into music on social media. She also clarified that the trademark was filed under her campaign, not personally, and was a result of public demand.

Crockett’s appearance on “The View” highlighted her creative approach to fundraising and her commitment to standing up for respect and facts in politics. Her decision to trademark the phrase and sell merchandise has sparked a wider conversation about the role of humor and satire in politics.

Some have praised Crockett’s move as a clever way to turn an insult into a positive, while others have criticized it as unprofessional and petty. However, Crockett remains unfazed, saying that she is focused on supporting her party and promoting respect in politics.

The exchange between Crockett and Greene has also drawn attention to the broader issue of civility in politics. Many have called for greater respect and decorum in political discourse, arguing that personal attacks and insults have no place in public debate.

“One of the things that I appreciate, is that because of the change in how we deal with each other, they are now aware that everybody’s not going to take it, and so if you’re going to come at people, come with your facts, come with a reason to be talking to me. But a put-down? You don’t wanna do that, we have something called a Dozen,” Goldberg said.

Crockett’s decision to trademark the phrase and sell merchandise has sparked a wider conversation about the role of humor and satire in politics. While some have praised her move as a clever way to turn an insult into a positive, others have criticized it as unprofessional and petty.

However, Crockett remains unfazed, saying that she is focused on supporting her party and promoting respect in politics. Her appearance on “The View” highlighted her commitment to these values and her creative approach to fundraising.

As the political landscape continues to evolve, it remains to be seen whether Crockett’s approach will inspire others to follow suit. However, one thing is clear: her decision to trademark the phrase and sell merchandise has sparked a wider conversation about the role of humor and satire in politics, and the importance of promoting respect and civility in public discourse.

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Written by Darnell Simmons

Investigative Journalist, social analysis